It’s Christmas in August: We Bring You the Gift of Insight

Want to Win the Holidays? Start Early with these Essential Consumer Insights
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Win the Holidays All Year Long.

This year, research into holidays and occasions was the most requested topic among our clientele of America’s top brands. Many of the calendar holidays are cultural touchpoints that represent billions of dollars in consumer expenditure each year. Whether it’s Mother’s Day, St. Patricks day, Kwanzaa or Christmas – our research can help you understand which audience has the largest buying potential – and how to reach them.

Before you dive into specific holiday insights, take a minute to review the three learnings below that reveal general holiday attitudes among consumer segments.

1.

Consumers value both tradition and individualism in their celebration, particularly Hispanic and African Americans. Show consumers that you understand this tension by illustrating how these segments can use your brand to individualize holiday traditions.

2.

Hispanic and Asian consumers are less likely to celebrate “traditional” American holidays like Fourth of July and Thanksgiving. To win with these consumers around these holidays, focus on segment-relevant themes such as immigration and family.

3.

Consumers are least likely to take offense at brand advertisements that activate on cultural holidays related to their race/ethnicity. If you choose to activate on a cultural holiday, use authentic members of the culture to communicate that the relevant segment is okay with the activation to diffuse concern from other segments.

Three Barbecue Insights to Fire Up Your Connection with Diverse America

Three Barbecue Insights to Fire Up Your Connection with Diverse America
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There’s one month left of summer and that means there are still many summer barbecues to be had. But the end of summer doesn’t mean barbecue season is over. Fall is just around the corner with a plethora of back to school and sports related barbecues.

As you activate with consumers throughout the year around the barbecue occasion, you’ll need to keep in mind how barbecues and cookouts vary for different segments. Multicultural consumers are more likely to agree that there is a difference between barbecues and cookouts.

Don’t miss the next webinar 

Navigating the OTT Revolution and Beyond: How Youth is Changing Content Consumption and the Media Landscape

September 4th, 2019

Our latest research on holidays and occasions features a deep dive into consumers’ barbecue experiences to help you navigate the occasion across segments. Read below for three key insights and download the barbecue insights deck for a deeper dive.

1. African Americans are more likely than other segments to have or attend a barbecue on traditional “barbecue holidays.” Most advertisements on barbecues do not include cultural winks to this segment. Focus on what matters to African Americans when advertising around these specific occasions—food, family/friends, and a lively atmosphere.

2. Hispanics are less likely than other segments to eat traditional barbecue foods such as hot dogs and hamburgers, and more likely to eat steak, chicken, and cultural foods. Make sure to appropriately represent what Hispanics have on their barbecue plates when engaged in targeted advertising.

3. Segments have barbecue-specific drinking preferences. White, Asian and Hispanic consumers lean towards beer, while African Americans prefer liquor. Alcohol brands should target their advertisements accordingly, while reminding consumers there are other available options.

Four Things You Need to Know about African-American Consumers

Four Things You Need to Know About African-American Consumers
  1. The African-American segment skews young. The segment’s median age is 34, 6 years younger than the non-African American population and 9 years younger than the White population. Given their size and relative youth, this segment will continue to be a must-capture for brands for years to come.

2. The African American segment’s share of expenditure growth was two thirds of the White segment’s despite the fact they are one fifth the size. And the segment’s purchasing power and expenditure is likely to continue growing as young African Americans achieve higher education levels.

3. African Americans have a high level of optimism about their personal future, despite the challenges they face and the perception that their path to success is steeper. In fact, the segment’s recognition of their unique challenges fuels their drive to succeed.

4. Across age groups, African Americans have a strong sense of cultural pride and a heightened sense of exceptionalism—i.e., a tendency to focus on one’s own internal uniqueness and the perceived differences that set one apart from others. These factors combine with the desire to share their voice, positioning them as powerful influencers across all segments.

Corporate Sustainability is a Multicultural Priority

Corporate Sustainability is a Multicultural Priority

If you’re trying to target “sustainable” shoppers, read this first.

Which elements of sustainability would multicultural consumers be willing to pay a premium for, and what are they doing to live more eco-conscious lives?

Which elements of sustainability would multicultural consumers be willing to pay a premium for, and what are they doing to live more eco-conscious lives?

 In a political climate that’s failing to meet both social and ecological needs, many consumers are “voting with their dollars” to reward brands that engage in sustainable business practices. If you know where those dollars are going, you can position your brands to be on the receiving end.

We addressed the issue of sustainability in a recent Collage survey, fielded to a nationally representative sample of 3,098 respondents with multicultural and youth oversamples. In it, we asked multicultural consumers if they’d be willing to pay more for certain sustainable business practices, and whether they engage in their own sustainable behaviors.

So how do you get consumers to buycott your products, rather than boycott them? See the attached mini-deck for more information about the following insights:

How well do you know your segments?

1.

  • Asians?
  • African Americans?
  • Hispanics?
  • Whites?
are most willing to pay a premium for brands providing their workers a ‘living wage’ .

2.

Women, especially among
  • African American?
  • Hispanic?
  • Asian?
  • White?
consumers, care more about the humane treatment of animals.

3.

  • White?
  • African American?
  • Asian?
  • Hispanic?
men are most attracted to brands that give back to local communities.

4.

  • African American?
  • Asian?
  • Hispanic?
  • White?
Millennials are the most regular consumers of meat alternatives.

Only this sample of our research has the answers.

Unwrapped: the biggest secret behind the food and beverage industry right now

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Alcohol Attitudes, Consumption, and Trends Among Millennials

Now that nearly all millennials are 21, we examine how they perceive and consume alcohol.  Learn how they compare to older generations, and discover their drinking habits and overall attitudes towards alcohol.